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GOT MY 2nd SHOT for COVID-19 Today!! No Symptoms.

Other things YOU can do to slow the spread:
1) Wear a High Quality Mask (3 layer Surgical Mask or better)
2) Healthy Diet, Exercise, and Sleeping Habits
3) Supplements like Zinc, Vitamin D, and Vitamin C
4) Stay 6 feet away from Non Household Contacts

I am Praying for a Blessed and Better 2021 for Everyone!!

#ErectileDysfunction #PenileImplant #LowTestosterone #Testosterone #Peyronies #COVID19 #penileprosthesis #inflatablepenileprosthesis #inflatablepenileimplant #Hormones #urology #doctor #vaccinesafetyadvocate #medicine #menshealth #sexualhealth #physician #Happiness #treatment #qualityoflife #lidokey #tampa #orlando #sarasota #centralflorida #siestakey #thevillages #saintpetersburg #prostatecancer #naplesfl

We got our COVID vaccines! The office that inoculates together... Very grateful to Dr Amy Witman/PrivateMD and her staff who spent their Saturday vaccinating the healthcare workers in our medical building. Glad to report just a sore arm for all of us!

Leyda Bowes, M.D.
Welcome to the Procial, Dr. Mass!

CHECK IT OUT -- "Office Treatments for Penile Curvature: Peyronies Disease." This Video Discusses how we can manage mild to Moderate Penile Curvature or Peyronies Disease with IN OFFICE Treatments.

FIND OUT HOW YOU & WEE Urologic Surgery and Wellness can help YOU live YOUR BEST LIFE IN 2021!!!
After all, YOU are OUR Number 1 and WEE are here to serve.

Call 941-212-1600 or Visit www.youandwee.com TODAY!!

#ErectileDysfunction #PenileImplant #BentPenis #CrookedPenis #MyPeyronies #Peyronies #erection #penileprosthesis #inflatablepenileprosthesis #inflatablepenileimplant #Hormones #urology #doctor #CurvedPenis #medicine #menshealth #sexualhealth #physician #Happiness #treatment #qualityoflife #lakewoodranch #tampa #orlando #sarasota #centralflorida #siestakey #thevillages #saintpetersburg #naplesfl

https://youtu.be/mDCggHdx3EM

HOW TO: Office Treatments for Penile Curvature (Peyronies Disease) / YouTube

This

https://youtu.be/mDCggHdx3EM

Physician Outlook 01/18/2021 11:56 AM

Excited to be partnering with MyDoqter and to be contributing to the Procial feed. Now, more than ever, it is SO important for physicians to be able to communicate information amongst each other and directly to patients in a forum that is professional, promotes mutual respect, and shares accurate medical information. If you aren't already done so, please claim and update your MyDoqter physician profile.
If you haven't subscribed to Physician Outlook, please take advantage now using "MyDoqter" as a subscription coupon (get an entire year of print magazines and full digital access to the website for $60) www.physicianoutlook.com/subscribe

Physician Outlook Magazine

Physician Outlook Magazine is a print and online magazine that provides a forum that is simultaneously informative, entertaining and educational.

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The term 'nonmelanoma skin cancer' is often used to refer to basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. However, other less common forms of nonmelanoma skin cancers include:
• 'Adnexal' carcinomas, which arise from sweat glands, sebaceous glands (oil glands), and hair follicles
• Merkel cell cancer
• Sarcomas of the skin

'Keratinocyte' carcinoma refers specifically to skin cancers that arise from skin cells (keratinocytes) in the epidermis. Basal cell carcinomas comprise approximately 80% of keratinocyte carcinomas, and squamous cell carcinomas comprise approximately 20%.

The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends that you see a dermatologist once a year for a full-body skin cancer screening. Individuals at higher risk for skin cancer may be screened more frequently. The Skin Cancer Foundation also recommends that you perform a monthly self-skin exam at home in a well-lit room.

You can find some helpful pointers on performing self-skin exams at:
https://www.skincancer.org/early-detection/self-exams/
and
https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/skin-cancer/find/check-skin

Detect skin cancer: How to perform a skin self-exam

Follow these tips from board-certified dermatologists to increase your chances of spotting skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable.

https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/skin-cancer/find/check-skin

HOW TO BEST PREPARE YOUR CHILD WITH ASTHMA OR ALLERGIES FOR SCHOOL

It’s that time of year again! Summer vacation is over and the kids are getting ready to go back to school. This Summer may have been met with some allergy challenges because it has been one of the hottest Summers on record. You may be worried about how your child with allergies and asthma may fare during the school year. Well, here are my five top tips to get your child with asthma or allergies ready for the school year.

1) Make sure the school is prepared to take care of your child in case of an emergency.
This is important for all children but specifically for children with food allergy and asthma. Children with food allergy must always have an adult ready to administer an epinephrine injector, and children with asthma must have access to an albuterol inhaler. Older children and high school children may know how to administer their medication. However, depending on the school’s policy and what is allowed, they may be restricted to seeing the school nurse or having the teacher administer the medications needed. It is important to feel comfortable with the school’s plan of action in case your child’s condition is to worsen. Have you discussed the signs and symptoms of when your child may be having a food allergy reaction or asthma attack with their teachers or school nurse? Does the school provide this type of training to their staff? These are all important questions to find out. If not, find out if there are plans to do so. Remember, it only takes one person to start change.

2) Has your child recently been evaluated by their Allergist.
An updated visit to your child’s allergist is always important, even with the most stable conditions. If your child is following up with their Allergist as directed, then you probably don’t have anything to worry about. If it has been a year or more, it is important that you schedule a follow-up soon. Over a year, many things can change. Your child’s medical condition or medical needs may have changed. Your child is growing and weight changes may require a change in dosing. Also, you can find out if new medications or treatments may be available. In addition, refills on expired medications may be needed. Lastly, an updated action plan on how to treat your child’s condition may be needed.

3) Address how medications will be given
Going back to school may mean a new schedule for your child and possibly yourself. Most allergy and asthma medications are given no more than twice a day. However, it can be difficult to coordinate the administration of a mid-day or late afternoon medication. Working with the school and your Allergist to figure out the best plan to have your child’s medication delivered correctly and timely with little interference to their day can be achieved.
In addition, a teenage child who has been given the responsibility of taking their own medications may need to be checked on periodically. It’s not unusual for me to see a teenager with exacerbated symptoms, all because they forgot a few too many times to take their medication and an upset parent sitting by their side. If you find that your child’s symptoms seem to be worsening or if you are not refilling their meds as expected, you may want to check on if they are taking their medications.

4)Address how your child’s condition may be affected by extracurricular and sports activity
A child with asthma and/or allergies may need special attention when it comes to them playing a sport or participating in extracurricular activities. Will they play outside but they have a severe pollen allergy? Will their asthma symptoms start once they start running? Or do you think your child’s care may need to be optimized so they can do their best? These are all questions that may be playing in your head. Addressing your concerns with your allergist is the first step. There are many ways to keep your child’s symptoms under control, including pretreating with medications prior to activities.
Furthermore, Extracurricular activities such as pottery making, painting, cooking, horticulture, etc, may have your child contacting possible allergens that may need to be addressed. If your child finds themselves with hives or a rash after an activity, testing and avoidance may be warranted.

5)Discuss your child’s care with caregivers
Coordinating your child’s supervision and safety to and from school may cause for other people to care for your child. Whether it is a friend’s mom carpooling the children to school, tutors, babysitters or nannies, it is important that all caregivers are aware of your child’s medical condition and have a plan of action. If you don’t have a plan of action, one may be obtained by your Allergist. Having one in place, may be particularly important in small children who may have difficulty expressing what they are feeling. Discussing the plan of action with your child’s caregiver will also help to give you insight on how comfortable your child’s caretaker is in implementing the action plan. If your child’s caregiver is not comfortable in recognizing signs and symptoms of your child’s medical problem or not comfortable in administering emergent medication, then secondary measures may need to be put in place, such as pre-prepared foods in a child with food allergy to decrease the likelihood of an accidental exposure, or maybe even a new caregiver. Most importantly, they should know how to contact you in case of an emergency.

Leyda Bowes, M.D.
This is great advice and guidance for all parents of school-age children. Thank you for sharing this information!

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